learning

Being smart about studying (#ACPEEP)

June 17, 2010

Students are notoriously un-smart about their study habits.  We know that anecdotally, but we’ve also got some solid data to show how bad they are.  A lot of the problem is that we can fool ourselves into thinking we’ve learned something.  From one of the ACPEEP’s summary documents: Many experiments have shown that repeated study […]

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How cognitive psychology can help us better educate our students (#ACPEEP)

June 17, 2010

I’m in a three day mini-conference right now, with a bunch of psychologists, and a ton of undergraduate education reformers like me.  The psychologists are all cognitive psychologists (i.e., they deal with how people think), and they’re part of a consortium called Applying Cognitive Psychology to Enhance Educational Practice (ACPEEP).  It’s a star-studded show, including […]

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We learn by taking tests (even when we get the wrong answer)

November 25, 2009

photo by Patrick Hannigan (click for Wikimedia link) We think of taking tests as something to assess whether we learned something, but there is a fascinating set of literature that shows that it does more than that.  Tests can be learning events in their own right.  It makes sense when you think about it.  How […]

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How we talk about what we learn (Blogging from the AAPT)

July 29, 2009

This PERC talk was from Anna Sfard about how we construct meaning socially How we talk about things, says Sfard, matters.  How we talk about things changes what we see, and also what we do. How do we talk about math or physics?  How do we talk about learning math and physics? We need more […]

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Blogs on teaching and learning

March 24, 2009

As y’all know, I’m a big fan of the blogosphere.  I recently ran across a couple blogs that I thought others might be interested in. The Teaching Professor, by a retired professor of teaching and learning at Penn State (MaryEllen Weimer).  Very good posts, on topics that we often discuss, such as self-assessment, and whether […]

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