FTEP workshops on learning goals and clickers

by Stephanie Chasteen on August 12, 2014

I am giving a set of three workshops on learning goals and clickers at the University of Colorado; here are the slides and handouts for participants to download.  Please let me know if you have any problems with these.

Thanks for being such a great group everyone, I don’t think I’ve had such an engaged and thoughtful set of participants before!

What do you want them to learn today?  Learning goals and formative assessment

Effective Facilitation of Clickers

Writing Great Clicker Questions

Other key clicker resources

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I’m catching up on some blog posts from the AAPT meeting.   I have to say, it’s nice to blog again, and I hope to make some time for it in the future!

Writing a grant?   One effort that I wanted to make sure that more people know about is the Increase the Impact project which has tangible resources to help you in effective development of a grant with greatest chance for educational impact.  The leader is Charles Henderson, whose publications page auto-fills in my browser, I visit it so frequently.  Charles is one of the leaders in thinking about how to support broader change in STEM education among faculty and institutions.  His work has resulted in a lot of information about what doesn’t work to create faculty change – the typical model is that we create some educational innovation, wait for faculty to adopt it, and then lament the fact that they didn’t.  They call this the “development and dissemination” model, and it’s been shown that this does work to create awareness among faculty of these different techniques, but not necessarily to help them use it.

The Increase the Impact project is aimed at helping education researchers effectively propagate their work.  One of the things that they’re doing is to study exemplary practice, by talking to people running a grant to see how they’re disseminating.  What they found is that many of these PI’s expected their work to have a large impact on instruction, but they didn’t have any plans to directly engage the people who would be adopting their work.   So, the current thinking on the project, is that they want to encourage PI’s to engage in interactive development of resources (e.g, engaging faculty int he process of creating instructional materials, partnering with other institutions during development, using an advisory board) and interactive dissemination (e.g., interactive workshops for faculty, multi-day workshops, using pilot sites, and other ways to develop ownership among faculty).  Then, provide support to instructors, such as free materials, or to be available over time for questions.

The project has videos, rubrics, and summary plans on their website (increasetheimpact.com) to help support you in creating an effective propagation plan.

 

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Lessons learned from 8 years of institutional transformation (#aaptsm14)

August 7, 2014

I was so busy blogging about everybody else’s presentations that I haven’t had a chance to write about my own talk at AAPT!  I’ve been working madly for the past few months to pull together a monstrosity of data on the outcomes and lessons learned from our work in the Science Education Initiative at the University […]

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Plenary at #perc2014: Carl Wieman and the future of PER

August 1, 2014

My mentor Carl Wieman was called upon to synthesize some of the main themes of the physics education research conference (PERC) this year.  Here are some of the things he discussed.  Note, he had a hard job, to try to draw some meaning from a lively conference with a short preparation time! Talking to some of […]

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Apples vs Oranges: MOOCs vs Brick-and-Mortar course (Mike Dubson #aaptsm14 #perc2014)

July 30, 2014

The PERC bridging session was kicked off by my colleague Mike Dubson, regarding an experiment we ran at Colorado with a MOOC vs traditional university courses. MOOCs have been hailed as revolutionary educational technology. What other revolutionary technologies have affected education? The printing press, the gasoline engine (allowing us to eliminate one-room schoolhouses). But there […]

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Peer Instruction and Student Preparation (#AAPTsm14)

July 29, 2014

I write a lot about the effective use of clickers and peer instruction, so I was excited at AAPT to see a talk with some interesting results on this educational technique.  Judy Vondruska (South Dakota State University) spoke about the “Influence of previous subject experience on interactions during peer instruction.”  She was using clickers like […]

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The gap between knowledge and practice (#AAPTsm14)

July 28, 2014

I’m at the American Association of Physics Teachers conference this week, and will be liveblogging from a few sessions. One my main interests is in how to support successful uptake of innovative educational techniques.  My talk on Wednesday will focus on some of the outcomes from the Science Education Initiative at Colorado, and lessons learned […]

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“Because the research tells me so”: Best practices in facilitating peer instruction

June 14, 2014

This is another repost from an article I wrote on the great i>clicker blog. — As a follow-up to last month’s post, on research showing that peer discussion helps students learn I’d like to share a variety of the messages that are coming out of the research on clickers and peer instruction – with particularly pertinent implications […]

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Do students learn by talking to each other?

May 30, 2014

Here is another re-post from an article I wrote on the i>clicker blog. —- This month I’d like to highlight a study which I think is crucially important in cementing the value behind peer instruction. It’s not new work anymore, but it so elegantly answers a key question – “do students learn by talking to […]

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New videos on undergraduate biology instruction

May 20, 2014

I’m happy to share the news about a new set of Creative Commons videos on undergraduate instruction – the Scientific Teaching series from iBiology:  http://www.ibiology.org/scientific-teaching.html.  These videos are all Creative Commons licensed so you can use them in your workshops, etc.  They have a newsletter you can sign up on to find out about new releases, […]

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How can you make a “good” clicker question GREAT?

May 16, 2014

This is another re-post of a blog post at the i>clicker blog. —- Sometimes we can be lucky enough to have access to a great set of clicker questions (see, for example, the list at STEMclickers.colorado.edu). But often a good set of questions for our course doesn’t exist, or another instructor’s questions don’t quite fit. Or, […]

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Getting students on-board with clickers and peer discussion

May 2, 2014

I have been blogging recently for the i>clicker blog (which has a lot of great articles on clicker use).  With their permission, I am reposting some of my articles here. —- I work a lot with faculty who are considering using clickers and peer instruction. Many faculty confide in me that they are concerned that students […]

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Free #clicker webinar: Facilitating Peer Instruction Effectively

January 25, 2014

I’m giving two free webinars this coming Wednesday on the use of clickers in the classroom to promote student discussion.  I’ve given a lot of these and they’ve always been very well received, come join us, it should be a good time!  Each is one hour long. 11 am PT / 2pm ET:  Recording  (I […]

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George Washington U. clicker workshop – Dec 10th

December 10, 2013

I am giving a workshop at George Washington University on the effective use of clickers, along with my wonderful colleague Stefanie Mollborn from Sociology.  This is a four-part half-day workshop, including information on facilitation, question writing, and tips for success. Do you want to learn how to use clickers – or any student voting technique […]

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Why I donated to PhET for #GivingTuesday

December 3, 2013

When I first came to CU from the Exploratorium — the premiere hands-on, “tinkering” science museum in the world — I was pretty disdainful about the idea of spending a lot of resources creating interactive simulations.  These aren’t hands-on, I thought, they’re fake, they’re missing the point.  Then I got to know the PhET simulations (http://phet.colorado.edu). […]

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PhET is looking for a K12 specialist!

October 30, 2013

I work part-time with the PhET Interactive Simulation project (http://phet.colorado.edu), which many readers are familiar with.  They have a rare position open, focusing on simulation design and use at the K12 level, and I wanted to share with you all!  Please share this announcement with others who might be interested. The online posting can be found […]

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Getting students to buy-in to non-traditional instruction

August 26, 2013

As the new semester is starting up, many of you are considering how to best promote student engagement in your course  – especially if you use non-traditional, research-based forms of instruction such as clickers, student discussion, or group work. We have a compiled set of approaches and materials, representing how instructors around the country help to […]

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PhET Simulations: Now on tablets! And a new logo!

August 21, 2013

Two big announcements from the PhET Interactive Simulations project! New!  Now for touch screens! First, PhET has been working their techie little butts off for quite a while to port their simulations over to HTML5.  No, I didn’t know what HTML5 was before this project started either.  It doesn’t really matter except that (a) it’s […]

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Clickers 101: Free webinar on Weds

August 19, 2013

Are you a college faculty member interested in clickers?  Come to our free, introductory webinar on Wednesday, 10:00 PT / 1:00 ET. To register, and for other webinars in this series, see http://bit.ly/19n2oEX (Note the session on October 30th geared towards humanities and social sciences, by my colleague Angel Hoekstra at CU Boulder). Handouts and slides […]

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Series of workshops on clickers and learning goals

August 19, 2013

I just completed a series of workshops on writing learning goals and using clickers to help with student achievement of those learning goals. You can find all the workshop materials on our website at the Science Education Initiative.  (Look for Past Workshops).  Includes handouts and slides, and you can download a zip of all materials. […]

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